items - View Cart
An Environmentally
Friendly Way to Enrich
Your Family's Lifestyle
Ranch Proprietors:
Howard and Cynthia Kuhlmann
Sierra Rose Alpacas, Grass Valley, California Sierra Rose Alpacas - Alpaca farm in CA Northern California alpaca clothing and farm products California alpaca farm Kids love alpacas Sacramento, CA area alpaca farm Alpaca lifestyle in California Alpacas on a California livestock farm
Facebook

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Christmas in July! Come join in the fun July 5th 10am-4pm

Come see the baby alpacas (called cria) and start your shopping early! 10% off everything in our shop (dress socks, alpaca yarn, dolls, etc), 10% off alpacas, and 10% off classes held this day (sign up early!!). Though we don’t guarantee snow, we do guarantee that you will have a ‘paca fun day! Door prize drawing at the end of the day. One day only! Click on the links for details on ranch tour schedule & classes. Must pre-enroll in knitting and crochet classes.

Coincides with our Monthly Open Farm Day

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

New at the Ranch – June

Many of you have let us know of your desire to have your very own alpacas on your land. Of course, we understand how they can capture your heart!! Talk to us about what it takes to have your own small herd.
Upcoming Neonatal Workshop: Aug 30th with Dr. Robin Skillman D.V.M. Sierra Rose Alpacas is proud to host this hands-on neonatal clinic Aug. 30, 2015, with Dr. Skillman D.V.M. Dr. Skillman is a highly respected camelid veterinarian that we are fortunate to have share this topic with us.

This Clinic is a must-have for all alpaca breeders! Even if you have had many healthy cria in the past, this workshop will help you gain more insight and knowledge on alpaca birthing. The goals of this class are to aid the owner in getting the dam ready for gestation; maintain a healthy pregnancy; produce a live cria and get that cria and mother off to a good start together. The morning session will be lecture and presentation. The afternoon session includes hands-on lab on how to identify and correct dystocia’s (cria not presenting correctly for normal birth).
Lunch is included. Class size limited. There is a lot of demand for this clinic, so register early as there are only 6 seats left.
When: Aug 30, 2015 (Sunday)
Time: 10:00a.m. – 4:00pm
Where: Sierra Rose Alpacas 530-272-1218
Cost: $150, and $125 for additional participants from the same farm (one course-book per farm). The price of the workshop is refundable should the attendee purchase alpacas or breedings to any of Sierra Rose Alpacas fully owned herd sires. Clinic is free to Sierra Rose Alpaca clients who have purchased dams from us. For more information, and to enroll, click here. Payment is required to confirm your place in this Clinic.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Francesca’s Corner – June

Hi there, this is Camille (seen at right). I’m writing in Francesca’s place because she is a little out of sorts right now. Her cria (i.e.baby) is due to be “unpacked” in the next week or so, and she is just plain ‘ol grumpy with it being hot and her being due any day now. Also, I think that she is worried about her new cria because of what happened last year with her little Opal—what with their visit to the doctor and all. But I think it will be just fine! After all, we have such good care here, no matter what goes on.

NEWS FLASH! Our suri friend Willow just delivered her first cria a few days ago. He is a cute little boy who looks just like her. Her delivery also required assistance, as I am told he was not lined up properly (called a dystocia) and needed help “unpacking” too. Thank goodness both are doing well now. I am so glad that I am not a first-time mom. It is so much easier after the first one.
Alpaca babyIn fact, I just delivered my third baby two weeks ago and is she ever special! My agents will be including several pictures of her. She was born at more than 18 pounds and has been on the move ever since (except at weigh-in time). Her blanket is a gorgeous reddish-gray. Her feet and tail have just tons of white and gray mixed in. And her little white face (with a dark smudge) is just adorable. You are welcome to see her on the first Sunday of July (July 5th) at the Christmas in July event. Francesca wanted to make sure I told you she is still available for her fans to come see her and her new cria – who is sure to be (almost) as cute as my little Velvet Rose. Cheers! Camille

I am available to see my fans by appointment, 530. 272.1218. Please check with my agents Howard and Cynthia for dates and times. I do hoofographs (like an autograph) for my fans and love photo-ops to show off my lovely fleece and trademark eyelashes.
Kiss Kiss,
Francesca

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Cria Checking Things Out


Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Cria Rolling in dust


Monday, March 10, 2014

Stampede (or coming in for dinner!) at Sierra Rose Alpacas

Calling the girls in for dinner! Woo hoo! Chow time (again!). While Kailee stops to Flirt with a couple of boys….


Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Spa Day at the Ranch

Waiting patiently for my pedicure and trim

Waiting patiently for my pedicure and trim

SPA DAY AT THE RANCH
WHEN THE LADIES COME IN TO HAVE THEIR HAIR AND NAILS DONE

By Howard Kuhlmann

Waiting patiently for my pedicure and trim
This much-anticipated event happens once or twice a year.

Our Winter Spa event gives the girls a chance to look their best for date night which will happen later during the Spring Dance. However, not all can be chosen, as only a select few will meet the high standards that we have set for the boy’s dance cards.

Spa day begins with the girls assembling in the laneway. They tend to be a little bit nervous about the whole thing, because, after all, they know that only the best will be invited to participate in the dance. We set up a waiting room at the top of the laneway. The girls crowd around this and can hardly wait for their chance to be brought in. We only allow five or six to be in at a time. This gives us the opportunity to look more closely at each one and to determine just what can be done to best bring out her inherent beauty.

During this examination we also look at eyes, ears, nose and teeth to see if any additional cosmetic work may need to be performed at this time or during a later appointment.

From the waiting room, the girls will be led one at a time into a personal, private space where the beauty treatments will be performed. Here Cynthia and I work as a team to see that everything that needs to be done is done. Cynthia handles the hair and fleece trimming while I work on the toe nails.

Many of the girls have long, luxurious bangs. While they may look nice, they can be difficult to see through and they also hide those beautiful dark brown eyes. Cynthia makes sure that each girl can show off her eyes to best advantage.

My job is Carefully clipping alpaca toenails. Notice the soft padded foot? Makes them easy on the land!to make sure that their nails are trimmed evenly and of the proper

Carefully clipping alpaca toenails. Notice the soft padded foot? Makes them easy on the land!
length (no nail sets or polish please; our girls prefer the natural look.) Long nails can grow out crooked and may also chip or crack, resulting in infection or other long-term damage.

When all is done, the ladies (all 30 of them) stand around comparing their new looks and discussing who will be chosen for the Spring Dance. Who do you think should be chosen for the boys dance card?
My turn next!

My turn next!


Monday, October 28, 2013

New Cria at Sierra Rose


Saturday, September 14, 2013

Alpaca Farm Days Festival is Here Again!

September 28-29, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. at Sierra Rose Alpacas

Last year, our Alpaca Farm Days Festival was a huge success! We hosted nearly 200 guests, who joined us to learn about sustainable small farming with Alpacas.

• This year’s celebration will focus on the care and raising of Alpacas, as well as their luxury fiber. Are you thinking of adding an Alpaca to your family? We’ll be covering everything from fencing to shearing, and what to do with the fleece once it is off the alpaca.

• For those fiber addicts (you know who you are), we’ll have a soap felting demonstration, learn how to card fleece or spin gorgeous yarn. Beautiful raw Alpaca fleece will be available for spinners – come early to get the best selection!

• You can enjoy learning how Alpaca fleece is processed into that luscious yarn you love. From shearing to cleaning, carding and spinning, we’ll cover how it’s done – and how you can do it too with a little practice.

• Learn all about carding and spinning with Hailey Parker! Hailey is a Natural Fiber Producer’s Certified Sorter Apprentice™, and Hand Spinner. If you haven’t before seen Hailey’s yarn, you are in for a treat! She will share her expertise and tips on spinning.
You are invited to learn how to do a wet-felting soap class. Bring a favorite soap, and for $2 to cover materials, you can learn how to make felted soap – a great gift for the holidays.

• Demonstrations are planned to showcase the care, handling, haltering and herding of Alpacas. If you have never handled an Alpaca, come learn just how easy it can be.

• Are you an avid gardener? Learn all about the magic of gardening with ‘organic gold’, (better known as Paca-Poo). You will have the most abundant garden ever! Whether you grow ornamental plants, vegetable gardens or fruit trees, you’ll want to watch this fascinating demonstration.

• We’ll have special pricing on select Alpacas. If you have been thinking about adding Alpacas to your family, this is a good time to do so. By this time next year, you can be producing your own yarn while you watch your garden grow.

• You won’t go hungry! Food and drinks will be available for purchase.

Alpacas provide a unique ‘circle of sustainability’ for anyone who wants to have a small farm. They eat vegetation without damaging the soil or ecosystem, help create fire breaks, their ‘Paca-Poo’ is considered to be as valuable as gold for vegetable and ornamental gardens, and they provide the highest quality fleece for fiber arts. If you have always wanted to live a more simple and sustainable lifestyle, the Alpaca is a wonderful animal that will provide much of what you need. Here are some of the most important attributes of Alpacas:


• They live happily on very small acreage. Two Alpacas can happily live on as little as 1/3 acre.

• They don’t hurt the soil. Because their feet are padded, Alpacas don’t cut through the top layer of soil and contribute to erosion. They don’t graze down to the dirt, either, making it easier to grow pasture.

• An Alpaca will eat vegetation that would otherwise be a fire hazard. You will not need to do much weed eating if you own an Alpaca.

• They are economical to own. They don’t need much hay to stay in good weight, and are generally healthy and easy to manage.

• Alpacas like people and because of their reasonable size (50% smaller than Llamas), can be even handled by children.

• They keep their pastures quite clean by creating a ‘community bathroom’. Alpacas make their own manure piles, which makes cleaning a breeze.

• The Alpaca manure can be used even without composting, though composting will make it easier to spread on your garden. It is considered the finest fertilizer available for plants, and will help your vegetables grow fast and produce more.

• Alpaca fleece is as warm as wool, but without the ‘itch’. Alpaca fleece is hypoallergenic, fire retardant, lightweight and insulating, even when wet. It wicks away sweat and is water repellent and stain resistant. It’s soft as cashmere; but Alpacas are not hard on the landscape like Cashmere Goats.

Monday, December 24, 2012

Alpacas Are Much More Dignified Than Reindeer!

A story in a Swedish newspaper relates that an enraged Reindeer terrorized schoolchildren at a local school. (Some accounts say it was an Elk, not a Reindeer) It was thought that the deer had gorged itself on fermented apples. Jan Caiman, a police officer in Molndal, said, ‘That could be the problem. We could be dealing with a boozy Reindeer’. Reindeer can weigh as much as 1,100 lb and personnel at the school described the erratic male as ‘completely mad’ an Alpaca would never do such a thing. We have far too much dignity.